The Best of Brisbane on Foot or Bike

photo credit: http://foter.com/f/photo/2327837338/8251c9e6ba/One of the best ways to explore a new place and make sense of a city is by getting out and about for a walk or bike ride. Human power the most cost-effective, healthy and reliable form of transport — plus, you get the chance to work off that three-course lunch! What’s more, wandering a city on foot or bicycle offers the opportunity to experience an area’s authentic culture the way the locals experience it. And what could be a better place to get outside this winter than beautiful, sunny Brisbane? So hurry up and book your Brisbane flights, because here is a guide to some of the best of Brisbane.

 

Kangaroo Point

Kangaroo Point is both a local hangout for getting some exercise and a tourist attraction, as it offers stunning views of the Brisbane city skyline. Combine a walk along the riverside path with an attempt at tackling the Kangaroo Point cliffs. It’s an easy route, so it is suitable for all ages, and there are plenty of places to stop for play or a picnic if you plan on taking the kids. To get there, catch a quick ferry ride across the river from the CBD, or if you have the time and energy, trot directly across the Story Bridge.

 

Brisbane River Walk

The New Farm to Southbank (or vice versa — Southbank to New Farm) trail, is a riverside walking route that allows access to many of Brisbane’s main attractions. From New Farm, head down Brunswick Street towards the remarkable Story Bridge. Cross the bridge and head into the city, where you can choose to saunter down Adelaide Street, or stay riverside the whole time for a longer (and potentially more beautiful) walk. Once you reach the edge of the city, stroll across Victoria Bridge, where you can take in the wonderful Brisbane city sights. Heading through Southbank you will pass a number of important buildings, including the Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane Convention Centre, Queensland Cultural Centre and the State Library of Queensland. Finish your experience with a well-deserved meal at any one of the reputable Southbank restaurants.

 

Boondall Wetlands

Boondall Wetlands Reserve is 15 km from the heart of Brisbane and can be reached by public transport. Here, you can experience culture and history by following the Aboriginal Art Trail. The trail consists of 18 different sculptures, each revealing a different tale about the Aboriginal tribes that previously inhabited the area. It also offers a fantastic cycle way if by chance you have access to a bike.

 

Mt Coot-tha

Mt Coot-tha is 10 km from Brisbane CBD and is a popular attraction for tourists because of its longstanding Aboriginal history. The area plays host to a range of artworks contributed by local Aboriginal artists. The track can be a bit steep and may not be suitable for small children.

 

Bulimba Heritage Trail

Located across the river from New Farm, The Bulimba Heritage Trail, which runs through the suburb of Bulimba, offers a fascinating walk through history. Follow the many plaques down Oxford Street and learn the story of Bulimba through the ages, including intimate details about its early Aboriginal inhabitants, first European settlers of the 1840s and facts surrounding the impacts that the Second World War had on the area.

 

Shorncliffe to Sandgate

The Shorncliff Pier to Sandgate Foreshore walk is a beautiful 2km-long stroll located a short 30-minutes drive from Brisbane city. It’s particularly gorgeous when the weather is stormy, as the area takes on a moody, electric atmosphere. The track runs waterside, and there are plenty of picnic and barbecue spots along the way. If you fancy walking a bit longer, start your journey at Flinders Parade in Brighton, as from there to Sandgate and back is about a 6km round trip.

Kangaroo Point photo credit: Burning Image Foter / CC BY

**This post brought to you by Expedia.

 

 

books by Nancy Sathre-Vogel

About Nancy Sathre-Vogel

After 21 years as a classroom teacher, Nancy Sathre-Vogel finally woke up and realized that life was too short to spend it all with other people's kids. She and her husband quit their jobs and, together with their twin sons, climbed aboard bicycles to see the world. They enjoyed four years cycling as a family - three of them riding from Alaska to Argentina and one exploring the USA and Mexico. Now they are back in Idaho, putting down roots, enjoying life at home, and living a different type of adventure. It's a fairly sure bet that you'll find her either writing on her computer or creating fantastical pieces with the beads she's collected all over the world.

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