Roadschool: travel + homeschool

klondike paddle boat in Whitehorse, YukonMore and more people around the world are combining traveling and homeschooling – and calling it roadschooling. It took many years before the idea of homeschooling had become a viable option to public schools, but now that it has reached the point where people are comfortable with it they are looking for new and creative approaches to homeschooling. Many families have opted for a life on the road and are roadschooling their children.

This method of schooling is generally done by a parent, usually while traveling full-time, and provides a hands-on, personal experience for learning. Roadschooling is subject to the same regulations that homeschool families face, and vary from state to state. Parents must register their children in their “home state” and must meet the regulations that their state requires. Depending on how long you plan to travel, it might be worth it to change your residence to a state with less regulations.

Education doesn’t have to take place within the confines of four walls, and roadschoolers have learned to take full advantage of that fact. Learning takes place around the clock, whereever you happen to be. Education is a lifestyle, with the whole family taking advantage of a visit to a battlefield in Pennsylvania to learn about the Civil War or learning how locks work during a visit to the Panama Canal.

Each family’s approach to roadschooling is as unique as that particular family. Some families take a very organized approach and carefully plan out their destinations to mesh with their curriculum. They may plan trips to historical sites, buy books about that period in history, and make an entire unit out of it. Other families have a more relaxed attitude about their child’s education, believing he/she will learn just from the experience of travel itself.

However you decide to attack the idea, roadschooling will be the best education your child will ever have!

books by Nancy Sathre-Vogel

About Nancy Sathre-Vogel

After 21 years as a classroom teacher, Nancy Sathre-Vogel finally woke up and realized that life was too short to spend it all with other people's kids. She and her husband quit their jobs and, together with their twin sons, climbed aboard bicycles to see the world. They enjoyed four years cycling as a family - three of them riding from Alaska to Argentina and one exploring the USA and Mexico. Now they are back in Idaho, putting down roots, enjoying life at home, and living a different type of adventure. It's a fairly sure bet that you'll find her either writing on her computer or creating fantastical pieces with the beads she's collected all over the world.

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2 Responses to Roadschool: travel + homeschool

  1. anneliese October 15, 2012 at 8:57 am #

    usually while traveling full-time, and provides a hands-on, personal experience for learning. Roadschooling is subject to the same regulations that homeschool families face, and vary from state to state. Parents must register their children in their “home state” and must meet the regulations that their state requires. Depending on how long you plan to travel, it might be worth it to change your residence to a state with less regulations.

    [Reply]

    Nancy Reply:

    @anneliese, If I lived in a state with strict regulations on homeschoolers, I think I would “move” to another state. In Idaho, we’re free to do whatever we want. I like that!

    [Reply]

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